Mushroom of the day #1
#education

NAME:
Death Cap

SCIENTIFIC NAME:
Amanita phalloides

EDIBILITY:
Deadly

LOCATIONS:
Found in some capacity around the world, the death cap mushroom has a tendency to grow in the northern hemisphere, finding home in North America, Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa. Tend to grow under conifer and hardwood trees (Spruce, Pine, Oak primarily). Note: The death cap mushroom spores a few hundred times in its life, making a worldwide issue concerning the population of death cap mushrooms.

DESCRIPTION:
The death cap is classified as a veiled mushroom with free gills. The death cap is identifiable upon close inspection of the mushroom. Most death caps will possess a veil, a membranous piece of tissue that protects the mushrooms stalk, and sometimes cap. The most common mushrooms to possess veils are Amanita mushrooms, a subspecies that accounts for 99% of all mushroom-related deaths, with the death cap accounting for 50% alone. The death cap fools those inexperienced with mushroom identification into thinking its an edible mushroom, which it is quite the opposite to. Death caps are identifiable by the smooth cap with slight light green coloration coating the cap, getting darker in the center. The death cap also possesses a sac at the base of the mushroom. Caps range from 2.5-6 inches wide (6.5-15 centimeters). Stalks are 3-5 inches long (7.5-12.5 centimeters) and 1/2 - 3/4 inches thick(1.5-2 centimeters)

SYMPTOMS OF CONSUMPTION:
The odor itself from a death cap is nauseating, but oddly enough, the younger death caps are described as having a pleasant taste by victims. Symptoms do not begin until 10-14 hours after consumption or longer. The process begins with intermittent vomiting, diarrhea, and cramps. After about a day, the effects of the mushroom wear off and the victim believes they are okay. By the 3rd or 4th day after consumption, the victim experiences extreme kidney/liver dysfunction. After 5-10 days, the victim dies if they do not receive adequate treatment

SOURCES:
National Audobon Society Field Guide to North American Mushrooms (book)
http://poisonousnature.biodiversityexhibition.com/en/card/death-cap (website)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amanita (website)


I'm very much favoring the educational mushroom alternative of posts to offer to Atmos, I will continue this daily in the future, to the best of my ability